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Abbi Klein profile

Abbi Klein, LCSW

Message from Abbi

My values as a therapist are based in the need to collaborate together for collective healing from the demands of our fast-paced world that prioritizes productivity over connection. Our goal together is to explore the interiors of the mind and body in order to shine a light on the ways we close off from ourselves and others, opening the path to live a more free and expansive life. In addition to traditional talk therapy, I work with somatic practices, including Ketamine-Assisted Psychotherapy.

About Abbi's practice

Availability

Availability

Weekdays 9am - 5pm

Fee

Fee

$$

Sliding scale

Style

Style

Directive

Reflective

Body-based

Method

Method

In-person available: Yes

Virtual available: Yes

Expertise

Expertise

Emerging Adulthood

Family Dynamics

Spiritual Crisis or Transition

Existential Crisis or Transition

Artist-Related Stress

Anxiety

Insurance

Insurance

Optum

Oscar

Cigna

United / Oxford

Aetna

State

State

NY

Why state matters

Background
Profile

Get to Know Abbi

"Working with Abbi the last few years has changed my life. Abbi brings compassion and intelligence that have helped to create a shift in my life that was once unimaginable to me. I am immensely grateful to her."

Johanna R., Client

"I have had the pleasure of working with Abbi for the past 6yrs., having the opportunity to both observe and collaborate with her in multiple treatment settings. As a clinician, Abbi’s use of intrinsic qualities (compassion, intelligence, empathy, positive ego strength) with her therapeutic acumen has assisted those she's worked with to see things in themselves that they weren’t previously able to see, resulting in them taking action toward becoming their best selves. As a colleague, she uses those same skills to support the growth and development of others through peer supervision, as communication and collaboration are essential elements for her, in her pursuit toward continued growth and development as she strives to be the best clinician she can be for those she works with."

Dorian D., MSEd., LP-MHC, RYT , Colleague

Have you received any particular training beyond your post-Bachelor's training?

In addition to being a Licensed Clinical Social Worker (MSW), I’ve taken continuing two year-long continuing education programs: Relational Psychoanalysis at the Stephen Mitchell Relational Study Center and Psychedelic-Assisted Therapy at the Integrative Psychiatry Institute (studying Ketamine-Assisted Psychotherapy, MDMA-Assisted Psychotherapy, Psilocybin-Assisted Psychotherapy, Psychedelic Integration and Harm Reduction). In my holistic training, I’ve completed over 500 hours of yoga teacher training, an Ayurveda for healthcare workers course, and have apprenticed teaching yoga with senior Ashtanga teacher for five years.

How can you tell if I am feeling stuck, unseen, or unheard?

I often see it come up in frequent experiences of frustration in the room. When we slow down and look at emotions as they come up during sessions, and the frustration is not connected to experiences outside of the room, we can identify it as relation to being unseen in the moment by the therapist. These types of explorations are not only integral to the therapeutic relationship, but transformative for the work itself. Also, sometimes, avoidance: avoidance of specific topics or avoidance of appointments themselves.

How long should I commit to being in therapy, at least in the beginning?

It takes at least three months to build a relationship and get used to something new–think about the probationary period at a job: 90 days. It takes about that long to know enough about an experience, past the beginning adaptation stage. Depending on your needs, our work can last six months to a year, or perhaps two to three years. Sometimes we will stop for a while and return back when additional support is needed. Many of my client reduce sessions to biweekly or monthly, and sometimes we just do check ins like a checkup with any healthcare provider.

What is unique about the work you do, or how have you found your work to be different than your colleagues'?

I am very personal and approachable. I use myself fully, understanding my personality and very being to be a part of my work, not separate to it. Studying consciousness has always intrigued me, whether through Western clinical models, Eastern practices, or the re-emerging study of psychedelics as a portal to consciousness and spirit lead me as a student of inquiry, rather than an expert. I act as a collaborator on exploration of the self as individuals and as humankind.

Where did you work before going into private practice?

I worked in a variety of community mental health settings, such as group-based programs for adults with severe mental health issues as well as outpatient mental health clinics. I also have extensive training as a yoga teacher and creating specific communities of support.

What is the best part of the work for you?

Connecting with amazing people and building beautiful relationships over time. Standing in someone’s corner through deep suffering and into a place of more peace and joy is an honor for me.

Is there ever a time when you would encourage me to leave or graduate? Or how do I know when it's time to end or move on, or time to stay and explore more?

Yes! While therapy can be a useful space, ongoing without an end, I encourage my clients to move on when I feel like there’s a positive course of growth and movement- always with the option to return back for fine tuning or when new issues present.

How will our relationship be different than relationships I have with friends/loved ones?

I always say the therapeutic relationship is unique because unlike well-intentioned friends and family who just want to see you happy and feeling good as soon as possible (or are having their own needs being met by you), I want you to learn how to make room for discomfort, understand the underlying meaning of emotions and actions, and make long lasting change- which can require patience, space, and time.

How do you approach diversity in the room or working with clients who may come from a different background than you?

I trust that my clients are the experts in their own experiences. I have specific training and professional experience, but I listen carefully and ask questions to ensure I am hearing you, and not my assumptions about you.

How can you tell if I am benefiting from working with you?

Therapy can often be challenging and emotional and not always “feel good”- but if you feel supported, heard, and are more aware of your own roadblocks and feel more prepared to navigate stressors, that’s a good sign.

Do you have experience (5-10 years+) working with any types of obstacles or people in particular?

Anxiety and panic attacks, anger, depression, bipolar disorder, relationship/family issues, psychosis, trauma, religious trauma, women’s issues, holistic health

Are there any philosophies or values that inform your work that I should know about?

My values as a therapist are based in the need to collaborate together for collective healing from the demands of our fast-paced world that prioritizes productivity over connection. Our goal together is to explore the interiors of the mind and body in order to shine a light on the ways we close off from ourselves and others, opening the path to live a more free and expansive life. In addition to traditional talk therapy, I work with somatic practices, including Ketamine-Assisted Psychotherapy.